Question

What is CrashPlan?


Answer


 

CrashPlan  is a cloud based automatic service that will regularly backup important documents on your laptop while you are at school or at home without you even realising it. It is important that any work you do at away from school over weekends or holidays is also backed up.

 

In the past you were responsible for doing regular manual backups using your TimeMachine Drive. Over 2015 and 2016 these drives will be phased out and all students and staff have been migrated to CrashPlan.

 

What is Backed Up?

Your home folder on your School laptop.

 

When Does it Backup?

CrashPlan backs up in the background while you are using your computer. It is designed to use minimal processing power and most people won't even notice CrashPlan is running.

 

Retention and Versioning

Part of the backup is that CrashPlan keeps every version of your files. If a file becomes corrupt, or you want to return to an earlier version, you can restore from a date and time you specify.

 

How do I Restore a File?

You can restore files by going to the CrashPlan Application or Online via the web access.

 

Can I See my Work on Other Computers or Devices?

You can restore files to any device, including Android, iOS and Windows Phone—at any time via the Web.

 

Will this Cause Me to Run Out of Bandwidth at Home?

CrashPlan works when your computer is awake and the default maximum upload is set to 225MB per hour from home. CrashPlan can also be paused for up to 24 hours. It will backup much faster when you are on the school network.

 

Why are we Changing?

CrashPlan allows you to forget about backing up. Being a cloud service means that your data is safe and easily accessible by you. There is no more worrying about your TimeMachine Drive.

 

Is my Data Secure?

CrashPlan encrypts your backup files before any data is sent to your backup destinations, using 448-bit encryption. Once your files are encrypted, they are transmitted to the school backup destination over a communication channel secured by 128-bit AES encryption.

 

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